San Diego Management & Monitoring Program


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Species objectives associated with threat

local NFO 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 SO

MON-IMP-IMG ANACAL-1

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

Annually inspect known areas occupied by arroyo toad to identify and reduce threats that can be managed at the local scale including road crossings, illegal encroachment, off-road vehicle use, non-native plants, trash dumping, grazing by livestock, and incompatible human recreation. Where possible, restrict access to arroyo toad upland and breeding habitats to help prevent disturbance to all arroyo toad life history stages (eggs, larvae, metamorphs and adults). Activities should be restricted in upland habitat year-round and in breeding habitat during the core of the breeding season (March to July).
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Using a regional "IMG" monitoring protocol, annually inspect significant Arroyo toad occurrences to assess status and quantify potential threats to determine management needs. AID_20161229_1831_100 Available for implementation
IMP-2 Roads should be examined for high risk areas for arroyo toad crossing and use. Only slow moving vehicles (<5mph) with an occupant experienced in arroyo toad identification should be allowed on high risk roads after sunset (Zimmitti and Mahrdt 1999). Available for implementation
IMP-3 An education program should be implemented that promotes the value of the arroyo toad and informs the public of restrictions and the importance of not disturbing the wildlife. Available for implementation
IMP-4 Based upon occurrence status and threats, determine management needs including whether routine management or more intensive management is warranted. Available for implementation
IMP-5 Submit monitoring and management recommendations to the MSP web portal Available for implementation
Criteria Deadline year
Annual IMG monitoring of Arroyo toad completed 2021
local NFO 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 SO

MGT-IMP-IMG ANACAL-2

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

Beginning in 2018, conduct routine management actions for arroyo toad identified through the IMG regional protocol monitoring, including protecting populations from detrimental human use (e.g. ORV, trampling, altered hydrology), removing invasive plants, and removing aquatic predators and exotic species (which compete and/or prey on arroyo toads, primarily young) within the known arroyo toad habitat.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Perform routine management activities such as protecting occurrences from human disturbance, controlling invasive plants, and removing invasive aquatic animals. available for implementation
IMP-2 Submit project metadata and management data to MSP web portal. available for implementation
Criteria Deadline year
Routine Management Completed as Needed Based Upon Monitoring Recommendations 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
ANACAL-1 MON-IMP-IMG Annually inspect known areas occupied by arroyo toad to identify and reduce threats that can be managed at the local scale including road crossings, illegal encroachment, off-road vehicle use, non-native plants, trash dumping, grazing by livestock, and incompatible human recreation. Where possible, restrict access to arroyo toad upland and breeding habitats to help prevent disturbance to all arroyo toad life history stages (eggs, larvae, metamorphs and adults). Activities should be restricted in upland habitat year-round and in breeding habitat during the core of the breeding season (March to July).
regional NFO 2020, 2021 SO

MON-SURV-SPEC ANACAL-4

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

In 2020 and 2021 (assuming adequate rainfall levels), conduct comprehensive arroyo toad surveys using USGS survey protocols throughout the MSPA on Conserved Lands in known occupied and potential habitat to determine current distribution and status of arroyo toad, collect data on threats and habitat covariates, and identify management needs.
Action Statement Action status Projects
SURV-1 Survey known occupied and potantial habitat on Conserved Lands across the MSPA to determine the distribution and abundance of arroyo toad on Conserved Lands. Available for implementation
SURV-2 Collect data on threats and identify management needs to support self-sustaining occurrences. Available for implementation
SURV-3 Continue to collect genetic samples from all arroyo toads captured. Available for implementation
SURV-4 Submit survey data and management recommendations to MSP web portal Available for implementation
Criteria Deadline year
Comprehensive surveys completed for Arroyo toad by 2021 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
ANACAL-1 MON-IMP-IMG Annually inspect known areas occupied by arroyo toad to identify and reduce threats that can be managed at the local scale including road crossings, illegal encroachment, off-road vehicle use, non-native plants, trash dumping, grazing by livestock, and incompatible human recreation. Where possible, restrict access to arroyo toad upland and breeding habitats to help prevent disturbance to all arroyo toad life history stages (eggs, larvae, metamorphs and adults). Activities should be restricted in upland habitat year-round and in breeding habitat during the core of the breeding season (March to July).
regional NFO 2017, 2018, 2019 SO

MGT-PRP-MGTPL ANACAL-5

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

In 2017, continue to convene with the working group of land managers, scientists, wildlife agencies, and local biologists knowledgeable in arroyo toad to review existing conditions of known occurrences on Conserved Lands, to prepare a plan for management of arroyo toad which considers each site, and to develop a regional monitoring strategy.
Action Statement Action status Projects
PRP-1 Convene working group meetings to review existing conditions of known occurrences. in progress
PRP-2 Use habitat models developed by USGS and results from survey and genetic analyses to identify suitable areas for long-term management. in progress
PRP-3 Conduct site visits as necessary to identify appropriate management actions. in progress
PRP-4 Develop an arroyo toad management plan. The plan should prioritize management actions for the next five years and detail tasks, lead entities, responsibilities, timelines, and budgets. in progress
PRP-5 Submit management plan to MSP web portal in progress
Criteria Deadline year
Arroyo toad management plan completed by 2018 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
ANACAL-1 MON-IMP-IMG Annually inspect known areas occupied by arroyo toad to identify and reduce threats that can be managed at the local scale including road crossings, illegal encroachment, off-road vehicle use, non-native plants, trash dumping, grazing by livestock, and incompatible human recreation. Where possible, restrict access to arroyo toad upland and breeding habitats to help prevent disturbance to all arroyo toad life history stages (eggs, larvae, metamorphs and adults). Activities should be restricted in upland habitat year-round and in breeding habitat during the core of the breeding season (March to July).
ANACAL-2 MGT-IMP-IMG Beginning in 2018, conduct routine management actions for arroyo toad identified through the IMG regional protocol monitoring, including protecting populations from detrimental human use (e.g. ORV, trampling, altered hydrology), removing invasive plants, and removing aquatic predators and exotic species (which compete and/or prey on arroyo toads, primarily young) within the known arroyo toad habitat.
ANACAL-3 MON-RES-GEN From 2017 to 2021, continue genetic studies of the arroyo toad in San Diego Co. (using genetic material collected during past and present regional surveys) to evaluate the degree of genetic variation within and between populations and to possibly identify genetic bottlenecks or barriers; this information will also be used to determine source populations to use in re-establishing arroyo toads in previously occupied areas.
ANACAL-4 MON-SURV-SPEC In 2020 and 2021 (assuming adequate rainfall levels), conduct comprehensive arroyo toad surveys using USGS survey protocols throughout the MSPA on Conserved Lands in known occupied and potential habitat to determine current distribution and status of arroyo toad, collect data on threats and habitat covariates, and identify management needs.
regional NFO 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 SO

MGT-IMP-MGTPL ANACAL-6

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

Beginning in 2018, implement high priority actions identified in the Arroyo Toad Management Plan.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Submit project metadata, management actions and report to MSP web portal waiting for precedent action
Criteria Deadline year
High priority management actions implemented for Arroyo toad 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
ANACAL-1 MON-IMP-IMG Annually inspect known areas occupied by arroyo toad to identify and reduce threats that can be managed at the local scale including road crossings, illegal encroachment, off-road vehicle use, non-native plants, trash dumping, grazing by livestock, and incompatible human recreation. Where possible, restrict access to arroyo toad upland and breeding habitats to help prevent disturbance to all arroyo toad life history stages (eggs, larvae, metamorphs and adults). Activities should be restricted in upland habitat year-round and in breeding habitat during the core of the breeding season (March to July).
ANACAL-2 MGT-IMP-IMG Beginning in 2018, conduct routine management actions for arroyo toad identified through the IMG regional protocol monitoring, including protecting populations from detrimental human use (e.g. ORV, trampling, altered hydrology), removing invasive plants, and removing aquatic predators and exotic species (which compete and/or prey on arroyo toads, primarily young) within the known arroyo toad habitat.
ANACAL-3 MON-RES-GEN From 2017 to 2021, continue genetic studies of the arroyo toad in San Diego Co. (using genetic material collected during past and present regional surveys) to evaluate the degree of genetic variation within and between populations and to possibly identify genetic bottlenecks or barriers; this information will also be used to determine source populations to use in re-establishing arroyo toads in previously occupied areas.
ANACAL-4 MON-SURV-SPEC In 2020 and 2021 (assuming adequate rainfall levels), conduct comprehensive arroyo toad surveys using USGS survey protocols throughout the MSPA on Conserved Lands in known occupied and potential habitat to determine current distribution and status of arroyo toad, collect data on threats and habitat covariates, and identify management needs.
ANACAL-5 MGT-PRP-MGTPL In 2017, continue to convene with the working group of land managers, scientists, wildlife agencies, and local biologists knowledgeable in arroyo toad to review existing conditions of known occurrences on Conserved Lands, to prepare a plan for management of arroyo toad which considers each site, and to develop a regional monitoring strategy.
regional NFO 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 SO

MON-IMP-MGTPL ANACAL-7

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

Beginning in 2018, monitor the effectiveness of management actions implemented for the arroyo toad.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Submit project metadata, monitoring data and reports to MSP web portal waiting for precedent action
Criteria Deadline year
Effectiveness of implementing high priority arroyo toad management actions determined 2021
regional NFO 2021 SO

MGT-PRP-MGTPL AQUCHR-3

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

In 2021, use the results and recommendations from the Golden Eagle Nesting, Foraging, and Habitat Use Study and the Golden Eagle Genetics Study to develop a comprehensive Golden Eagle Management Plan for managing golden eagle territories with nesting, roosting, and foraging habitat on Conserved Lands within the MSPA (see occurrence table). The plan should include recommendations for managing important foraging habitat to minimize human disturbance to foraging eagles and to improve habitat quality to enhance prey availability, especially during drought periods. The plan should also include specifications to control human disturbance that could discourage nesting, cause nest abandonment, or adversely affect the survival of nestlings, and for managing unstable nest ledges or tree nest sites that are critical to maintaining a breeding pair in territories with limited nesting sites.
Action Statement Action status Projects
PRP-1 Prepare a five year plan for maintaining and enhancing golden eagle foraging habitat in grasslands and suitable areas in open coastal sage scrub and chaparral, and for reducing human impacts to foraging eagles. Use the Golden Eagle Nesting, Foraging, and Habitat Use Study and modeling results to identify important foraging areas for golden eagles on Conserved Lands in the MSPA. Specify management to reduce human disturbance in important foraging habitat and to manage invasive annual grasses to promote abundant prey, such as California ground squirrels and black-tailed jackrabbit. Include a mechanism for updating the management plan with monitoring results and specific management recommendations from the Comprehensive Golden Eagle Monitoring Plan. waiting for precedent action
PRP-2 Prioritize for management, those nest ledges and trees that are in territories where alternative nest sites are limited. Prepare a nest restoration plan for each prioritized unstable nest ledge or vulnerable nest tree in consultation with a qualified golden eagle biologist. waiting for precedent action
PRP-3 Establish procedures for managing human activities within the nest site protective zone, including rerouting trails, closing trails during the breeding season, educational outreach, and enforcement. waiting for precedent action
PRP-4 Submit project metadata and Comprehensive Golden Eagle Management Plan to the MSP Web Portal. waiting for precedent action
Criteria Deadline year
Comprehensive Golden Eagle Management Plan Completed by 2022 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
AQUCHR-1 MON-RES-SPEC From 2017 to 2019, continue the Golden Eagle Nesting, Foraging, and Habitat Use Study, begun in 2014, to monitor golden eagle territory occupancy and reproduction in the MSPA (see occurrence table) and to track eagle movements to identify important foraging, nesting and roosting areas. Continue to study the influence of human activity and land use on patterns of eagle movement and habitat use, measure the response of eagles to human activity while foraging, and determine whether locally produced floaters recruit into the breeding population.
AQUCHR-2 MON-RES-GEN From 2017 to 2019, continue the Golden Eagle Genetics Study begun in 2014 and collect genetic samples in conjunction with eagle captures for the Golden Eagle Nesting, Foraging, and Habitat Use Study. Analyze these samples to determine the population genetic structure of golden eagles within the MSPA (see occurrence table) and their relationship to eagle populations in other parts of the western United States.
AQUCHR-4 MON-PRP-MONPL In 2021, use the results and recommendations from the Golden Eagle Nesting, Foraging, and Habitat Use Study and the Golden Eagle Genetics Study to develop a comprehensive Golden Eagle Monitoring Plan for monitoring golden eagle status and assessing nesting, roosting, and foraging habitat on Conserved Lands within the MSPA (see occurrence table). The plan should include standardized monitoring protocols to track the status of eagles at nesting territories, to monitor use of important foraging areas, and to collect habitat and threats covariate data to inform needed management actions.
regional NFO 2021 SO

MON-PRP-MONPL AQUCHR-4

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

In 2021, use the results and recommendations from the Golden Eagle Nesting, Foraging, and Habitat Use Study and the Golden Eagle Genetics Study to develop a comprehensive Golden Eagle Monitoring Plan for monitoring golden eagle status and assessing nesting, roosting, and foraging habitat on Conserved Lands within the MSPA (see occurrence table). The plan should include standardized monitoring protocols to track the status of eagles at nesting territories, to monitor use of important foraging areas, and to collect habitat and threats covariate data to inform needed management actions.
Action Statement Action status Projects
PRP-1 Complete a plan to monitor the status and habitat use of eagles over the long term within the MSPA that is based upon the occupancy monitoring study in the Golden Eagle Nesting, Foraging and Habitat Use Study. The plan should include detailed monitoring objectives, statistically valid sampling design, sampling locations, monitoring timeline, and standardized monitoring protocols to record eagles and important habitat and threat attributes. waiting for precedent action
PRP-2 Develop a plan to rapidly assess the condition of important golden eagle foraging habitat on Conserved Lands across the MSPA using a standardized protocol, statistically valid sampling design, and designated sampling locations. The protocol should describe monitoring methods to collect specific habitat and threat covariates associated with habitat quality, as identified by the Golden Eagle Nesting, Foraging, and Habitat Use Study. The results of this monitoring will be used to periodically prioritize sites and develop specific recommendations for managing foraging habitat to minimize human disturbance and enhance habitat quality to support abundant eagle prey. waiting for precedent action
PRP-3 A golden eagle expert should prepare a protocol, standardized data sheets, and provide periodic training to land managers in how to safely conduct annual nest inspections and determine management needs with minimal disturbance to eagles. The protocol should assess nest sites during the non-breeding season to identify nest ledges that are unstable and nest trees that are vulnerable to loss from threats such as wildfire, pests, and fungal pathogens. waiting for precedent action
PRP-4 Submit project metadata, sampling design, sampling locations, protocols and Comprehensive Golden Eagle Monitoring Plan to the MSP Web Portal. waiting for precedent action
Criteria Deadline year
Comprehensive Golden Eagle Monitoring Plan Completed by 2022 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
AQUCHR-1 MON-RES-SPEC From 2017 to 2019, continue the Golden Eagle Nesting, Foraging, and Habitat Use Study, begun in 2014, to monitor golden eagle territory occupancy and reproduction in the MSPA (see occurrence table) and to track eagle movements to identify important foraging, nesting and roosting areas. Continue to study the influence of human activity and land use on patterns of eagle movement and habitat use, measure the response of eagles to human activity while foraging, and determine whether locally produced floaters recruit into the breeding population.
AQUCHR-2 MON-RES-GEN From 2017 to 2019, continue the Golden Eagle Genetics Study begun in 2014 and collect genetic samples in conjunction with eagle captures for the Golden Eagle Nesting, Foraging, and Habitat Use Study. Analyze these samples to determine the population genetic structure of golden eagles within the MSPA (see occurrence table) and their relationship to eagle populations in other parts of the western United States.
AQUCHR-3 MGT-PRP-MGTPL In 2021, use the results and recommendations from the Golden Eagle Nesting, Foraging, and Habitat Use Study and the Golden Eagle Genetics Study to develop a comprehensive Golden Eagle Management Plan for managing golden eagle territories with nesting, roosting, and foraging habitat on Conserved Lands within the MSPA (see occurrence table). The plan should include recommendations for managing important foraging habitat to minimize human disturbance to foraging eagles and to improve habitat quality to enhance prey availability, especially during drought periods. The plan should also include specifications to control human disturbance that could discourage nesting, cause nest abandonment, or adversely affect the survival of nestlings, and for managing unstable nest ledges or tree nest sites that are critical to maintaining a breeding pair in territories with limited nesting sites.
regional and/or local NFO 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 SL

MGT-IMP-TRAN EMYMAR-1

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8

From 2017 to 2021, continue efforts to expand and translocate occurrences of pond turtles to increase to self-sustaining levels in MU3 in the Sweetwater and Otay River Watersheds (at SPER, RJER, and other suitable sites) and identify, expand, and translocate pond turtles in at least 2 other watersheds in the MSPA, including but not limited to the San Diego and San Dieguito Rivers. Translocation efforts may include management of invasive aquatic and plant species, providing access protection, and headstart efforts.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Conduct routine management as needed at the Sycuan Peak ER occurrence of southwestern pond turtle. In progress
IMP-2 Conduct routine management as needed at the Rancho Jamul ER translocated occurrence of southwestern pond turtle. In progress
IMP-3 Continue to identify, begin management of invasive species, and translocate pond turtle to at least 2 suitable locations in the San Dieguito and San Diego River (e.g. El Monte Ponds, Boulder Creek Preserve) watersheds. In progress
IMP-4 Submit monitoring and management data to the regional MSP web portal. In progress
Criteria Deadline year
By 2021, 2 new occurrences translocated in the San Diego and San Dieguito River Watersheds; SPER and RJER occurrences increased by 20% through recruitment from 2017 leve 2021
regional and/or local NFO 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 SL

MON-IMP-TRAN EMYMAR-2

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8

From 2017 to 2021, continue monitoring the effectiveness of southwestern pond turtle translocation experiments at SPER and RJER (see Table of Occurrences) and any additional translocated occurrences.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Continue to monitor the expanded and head-started occurrence and/or habitat at SPER and RJER to document success. In progress
IMP-2 Monitor other translocated occurrences to document success. waiting for precedent action
Criteria Deadline year
Southwestern Pond Turtle Translocation Monitoring and Reports Completed Annually 2021
regional and/or local NFO 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 SL

MGT-IMP-IEX EMYMAR-3

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8

From 2017 to 2021, implement invasive aquatic animal and invasive plant control at natural and translocated pond turtle occurrences as needed to increase recruitment and basking habitat.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Follow guidelines in the existing Invasive Plant Strategic Plan (CBI et al 2012) and invasive plant and animal sections of the updated MSP. In progress
IMP-2 Submit management data to the regional MSP web portal. In progress
IMP-3 Unknown
regional NFO 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 SL

MON-IMP-IMG EMYMAR-4

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8

From 2017 to 2021, biennially inspect the existing occurrences of southwestern pond turtle to identify necessary management actions in order to support the expansion of the occurrence to self sustaining levels.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Use regional IMG monitoring protocol to assess status, habitat, and quantify potential threats. Available for implementation
IMP-2 Based upon occurrence status and threats, determine management needs including whether routine management or more intensive management is warranted. Available for implementation
IMP-3 Submit monitoring and management data to the regional MSP web portal. Available for implementation
Criteria Deadline year
Surveys Completed every two years with management recommendations 2021
regional NFO 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 SL

MGT-IMP-IMG EMYMAR-5

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8

From 2017 to 2021, conduct routine management actions identified through the IMG regional protocol monitoring, including protecting populations from disturbance, removing invasive plants, and removing aquatic predators and exotic species (which compete and or prey on western pond turtle, primarily young) within the known occupied and suitable habitat.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Perform routine management activities such as protecting occurrences from disturbance, controlling invasive plants, and removing invasive aquatic animals. some occurrences are in progress
IMP-2 Submit project metadata and management data to MSP web portal. some occurrences are in progress
Criteria Deadline year
Routine Management Completed as Needed Based Upon Monitoring Recommendations 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
EMYMAR-3 MGT-IMP-IEX From 2017 to 2021, implement invasive aquatic animal and invasive plant control at natural and translocated pond turtle occurrences as needed to increase recruitment and basking habitat.
regional NFO 2018 SL

MGT-PRP-MGTPL EMYMAR-6

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8

Beginning in 2018, prepare a management plan for southwestern pond turtles that includes identification of high priority management actions at sites with self sustaining populations, as well as actions to establish of at least 2 additional pond turtle populations to increase resilience to fire and other threats. Include guidance & prioritizations for next steps for translocations. The plan should include actions to manage threats from hydrology, debris, invasive animals and plants, and fire, and the creation of basking sites.
Action Statement Action status Projects
PRP-1 Develop a southwestern pond turtle management plan using the survey data with information on occurrence status and threats, habitat models, and management needs to determine if an appropriate location waiting for precedent action
PRP-2 The plan should prioritize management actions for the next five years and detail tasks, lead entities, responsibilities, timelines, and budgets waiting for precedent action
PRP-3 Submit management plan to MSP web portal waiting for precedent action
Criteria Deadline year
Management Plan for Southwestern pond turtle completed by 2018. 2018
Code Obj. code Statement
EMYMAR-1 MGT-IMP-TRAN From 2017 to 2021, continue efforts to expand and translocate occurrences of pond turtles to increase to self-sustaining levels in MU3 in the Sweetwater and Otay River Watersheds (at SPER, RJER, and other suitable sites) and identify, expand, and translocate pond turtles in at least 2 other watersheds in the MSPA, including but not limited to the San Diego and San Dieguito Rivers. Translocation efforts may include management of invasive aquatic and plant species, providing access protection, and headstart efforts.
EMYMAR-2 MON-IMP-TRAN From 2017 to 2021, continue monitoring the effectiveness of southwestern pond turtle translocation experiments at SPER and RJER (see Table of Occurrences) and any additional translocated occurrences.
EMYMAR-3 MGT-IMP-IEX From 2017 to 2021, implement invasive aquatic animal and invasive plant control at natural and translocated pond turtle occurrences as needed to increase recruitment and basking habitat.
EMYMAR-4 MON-IMP-IMG From 2017 to 2021, biennially inspect the existing occurrences of southwestern pond turtle to identify necessary management actions in order to support the expansion of the occurrence to self sustaining levels.
EMYMAR-9 MGT-PRP-RESCPL Beginning in 2018, establish program and permits to allow emergency management actions for the Southwestern pond turtle during or immediately following wildfire events, such as implementation of emergency rescue and temporary translocation, to protect from potential loss or extirpation.
regional NFO 2019, 2020, 2021 SL

MGT-IMP-MGTPL EMYMAR-7

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8

Beginning in 2019, implement highest priority management actions as identified in the Southwestern pond turtle management plan.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Management actions to be determined by the management plan. waiting for precedent action
IMP-4 Submit project metadata and management data to MSP web portal. unknown
Criteria Deadline year
By 2021, =1 High Priority Management Action Implemented from the Southwestern pond turtle Management Plan 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
EMYMAR-5 MGT-IMP-IMG From 2017 to 2021, conduct routine management actions identified through the IMG regional protocol monitoring, including protecting populations from disturbance, removing invasive plants, and removing aquatic predators and exotic species (which compete and or prey on western pond turtle, primarily young) within the known occupied and suitable habitat.
regional NFO 2019, 2020, 2021 SL

MON-IMP-MGTPL EMYMAR-8

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8

Beginning in 2019, monitor the effectiveness of management actions implemented for the Southwestern pond turtle.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Submit monitoring data and report to MSP web portal waiting for precedent action
Criteria Deadline year
Effectiveness of High Priority Management Actions Determined 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
EMYMAR-5 MGT-IMP-IMG From 2017 to 2021, conduct routine management actions identified through the IMG regional protocol monitoring, including protecting populations from disturbance, removing invasive plants, and removing aquatic predators and exotic species (which compete and or prey on western pond turtle, primarily young) within the known occupied and suitable habitat.
EMYMAR-6 MGT-PRP-MGTPL Beginning in 2018, prepare a management plan for southwestern pond turtles that includes identification of high priority management actions at sites with self sustaining populations, as well as actions to establish of at least 2 additional pond turtle populations to increase resilience to fire and other threats. Include guidance & prioritizations for next steps for translocations. The plan should include actions to manage threats from hydrology, debris, invasive animals and plants, and fire, and the creation of basking sites.
regional NFO 2017, 2020 SL

MON-SURV-SPEC EYPHAR-1

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 11

In 2017 and 2020, conduct host plant (San Diego sedge), adult, larval and hibernaculum surveys, and habitat assessments for Harbison's dun skipper that were initiated in 2013 in the MSPA (see Table of Occurrences) to further document the butterfly's current distribution and population size, define habitat requirements, and to assess habitat and threats at survey sites.
Action Statement Action status Projects
SURV-1 Search for Harvison's dun skipper adults, butterfly hiberniculum, larvae and host plants (San Diego sedge) at known occupied habitat, historically occupied habitat and in suitable potential habitat, to determine the extent of the butterfly's range, population sizes, and to better understand habitat relationships. Use a standardized protocol to collect habitat and threats covariate data at each site for developing and prioritizing management actions. In progress
SURV-2 Submit project metadata, datasets, analyses and report with management recommendations to the MSP Web Portal. In progress
Criteria Deadline year
Harbison's Dun Skipper Surveys and Reports Completed in 2018 and 2021 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
EYPHAR-2 MON-RES-GEN In 2017, in conjunction with adult surveys and the marking study for Harbison's dun skipper (see Table of Occurrences), capture adult butterflies and collect non-lethal genetic samples (i.e., legs) to analyze population genetic structure, dispersal and connectivity between populations, and genetic diversity. Use the analytical results to develop management recommendations to improve connectivity and to maintain or enhance genetic diversity at Harbison's dun skipper occurrences.
EYPHAR-3 MON-RES-SPEC In 2017, conduct a marking study of adult Harbison's dun skippers during the flight season to determine connectivity within habitat patches in a watershed. Design the study to obtain information on local movement patterns, flight season phenology, demography, detection probabilities, longevity, individual behavior, nectaring sources, and relationship between maximum counts and local population size. The results of this study should be used to develop specific management recommendations to be incorporated in the Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan.
EYPHAR-4 MON-DEV-MODL In 2017, develop habitat suitability models for Harbison's dun skipper, the host plant (San Diego sedge), and oak woodlands under current and future climate change scenarios, and conduct fire risk modeling with different management scenarios to identify potential fire and climate refugia. The results of this modeling will be considered in the development of monitoring and management plans.
EYPHAR-5 MGT-PRP-MGTPL In 2017, prepare a 5 year Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan that includes the results from butterfly surveys and habitat assessments, genetic and marking studies, and climate and fire modeling to characterize habitat quality at occupied occurrences and unoccupied suitable habitat important for enhancing connectivity, expanding populations or that could serve as fire and climate refugia. The plan should include an overall management strategy, identification and prioritization of sites where management is needed, and specific management recommendations for each site. It should also include actions to reduce fire risk at prioritized occurrences and specifications for monitoring the effectiveness of implementing high priority management actions.
regional PRE 2017 SL

MON-DEV-MODL EYPHAR-4

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 11

In 2017, develop habitat suitability models for Harbison's dun skipper, the host plant (San Diego sedge), and oak woodlands under current and future climate change scenarios, and conduct fire risk modeling with different management scenarios to identify potential fire and climate refugia. The results of this modeling will be considered in the development of monitoring and management plans.
Action Statement Action status Projects
DEV-1 Submit project metadata, modeling datasets, results and report to the MSP Web Portal. In progress
Criteria Deadline year
Harbison's Dun Skipper Current and Future Climate Habitat Models and Report Completed in 2017 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
EYPHAR-5 MGT-PRP-MGTPL In 2017, prepare a 5 year Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan that includes the results from butterfly surveys and habitat assessments, genetic and marking studies, and climate and fire modeling to characterize habitat quality at occupied occurrences and unoccupied suitable habitat important for enhancing connectivity, expanding populations or that could serve as fire and climate refugia. The plan should include an overall management strategy, identification and prioritization of sites where management is needed, and specific management recommendations for each site. It should also include actions to reduce fire risk at prioritized occurrences and specifications for monitoring the effectiveness of implementing high priority management actions.
EYPHAR-8 MGT-IMP-IGNPL Beginning in 2019, implement high priority MSP 2018 Wildfire Ignition Reduction Plan measures developed for Harbison's Dun Skipper to reduce the probability of ignition at most at-risk occurrences.
regional PRE 2017 SL

MGT-PRP-MGTPL EYPHAR-5

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 11

In 2017, prepare a 5 year Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan that includes the results from butterfly surveys and habitat assessments, genetic and marking studies, and climate and fire modeling to characterize habitat quality at occupied occurrences and unoccupied suitable habitat important for enhancing connectivity, expanding populations or that could serve as fire and climate refugia. The plan should include an overall management strategy, identification and prioritization of sites where management is needed, and specific management recommendations for each site. It should also include actions to reduce fire risk at prioritized occurrences and specifications for monitoring the effectiveness of implementing high priority management actions.
Action Statement Action status Projects
PRP-1 Work with the Butterfly Working Group consisting of species experts, scientists, wildlife agencies, land managers and other stakeholders to develop prioritized management actions. In progress
PRP-2 Submit project metadata and Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plant to the MSP Web Portal. In progress
Criteria Deadline year
Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan Completed in 2017 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
EYPHAR-1 MON-SURV-SPEC In 2017 and 2020, conduct host plant (San Diego sedge), adult, larval and hibernaculum surveys, and habitat assessments for Harbison's dun skipper that were initiated in 2013 in the MSPA (see Table of Occurrences) to further document the butterfly's current distribution and population size, define habitat requirements, and to assess habitat and threats at survey sites.
EYPHAR-2 MON-RES-GEN In 2017, in conjunction with adult surveys and the marking study for Harbison's dun skipper (see Table of Occurrences), capture adult butterflies and collect non-lethal genetic samples (i.e., legs) to analyze population genetic structure, dispersal and connectivity between populations, and genetic diversity. Use the analytical results to develop management recommendations to improve connectivity and to maintain or enhance genetic diversity at Harbison's dun skipper occurrences.
EYPHAR-3 MON-RES-SPEC In 2017, conduct a marking study of adult Harbison's dun skippers during the flight season to determine connectivity within habitat patches in a watershed. Design the study to obtain information on local movement patterns, flight season phenology, demography, detection probabilities, longevity, individual behavior, nectaring sources, and relationship between maximum counts and local population size. The results of this study should be used to develop specific management recommendations to be incorporated in the Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan.
EYPHAR-4 MON-DEV-MODL In 2017, develop habitat suitability models for Harbison's dun skipper, the host plant (San Diego sedge), and oak woodlands under current and future climate change scenarios, and conduct fire risk modeling with different management scenarios to identify potential fire and climate refugia. The results of this modeling will be considered in the development of monitoring and management plans.
EYPHAR-5 MGT-PRP-MGTPL In 2017, prepare a 5 year Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan that includes the results from butterfly surveys and habitat assessments, genetic and marking studies, and climate and fire modeling to characterize habitat quality at occupied occurrences and unoccupied suitable habitat important for enhancing connectivity, expanding populations or that could serve as fire and climate refugia. The plan should include an overall management strategy, identification and prioritization of sites where management is needed, and specific management recommendations for each site. It should also include actions to reduce fire risk at prioritized occurrences and specifications for monitoring the effectiveness of implementing high priority management actions.
EYPHAR-6 MGT-IMP-MGTPL Beginning in 2018, implement highest priority management actions identified in the Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan.
EYPHAR-7 MON-IMP-MGTPL Beginning in 2018, monitor effectiveness of implementation of highest priority management actions identified in the Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan.
EYPHAR-8 MGT-IMP-IGNPL Beginning in 2019, implement high priority MSP 2018 Wildfire Ignition Reduction Plan measures developed for Harbison's Dun Skipper to reduce the probability of ignition at most at-risk occurrences.
EYPHAR-9 MON-IMP-FMGT For at least the first 3 years following a wildfire, monitor recovery of Harbison's dun skipper occurrences and habitat affected by fire. Use a standardized postfire protocol to document the butterfly's distribution and abundance over time and to characterize habitat recovery and threats following a wildfire. Postfire monitoring should encompass occupied dun skipper sites and unoccupied sites that are important for enhancing connectivity or for future population expansion. The postfire monitoring should identify and prioritize management actions to assist in recovery of Harbison's dun skipper populations and important habitat patches.
EYPHAR-10 MGT-IMP-FMGT For at least the first 3 years following a fire, implement management actions identified by postfire monitoring as necessary to protect and recover Harbison's dun skipper occurrences and habitat impacted by wildfire.
regional PRE 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 SL

MGT-IMP-MGTPL EYPHAR-6

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 11

Beginning in 2018, implement highest priority management actions identified in the Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Submit project metadata, management datasets, and report to the MSP Web Portal. waiting for precedent action
Criteria Deadline year
By 2022, =1 High Priority Management Action Implemented from the Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
EYPHAR-5 MGT-PRP-MGTPL In 2017, prepare a 5 year Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan that includes the results from butterfly surveys and habitat assessments, genetic and marking studies, and climate and fire modeling to characterize habitat quality at occupied occurrences and unoccupied suitable habitat important for enhancing connectivity, expanding populations or that could serve as fire and climate refugia. The plan should include an overall management strategy, identification and prioritization of sites where management is needed, and specific management recommendations for each site. It should also include actions to reduce fire risk at prioritized occurrences and specifications for monitoring the effectiveness of implementing high priority management actions.
EYPHAR-7 MON-IMP-MGTPL Beginning in 2018, monitor effectiveness of implementation of highest priority management actions identified in the Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan.
regional PRE 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 SL

MON-IMP-MGTPL EYPHAR-7

Management units: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 11

Beginning in 2018, monitor effectiveness of implementation of highest priority management actions identified in the Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Submit metadata, management effectiveness datasets, analyses, and report to the MSP Web Portal. waiting for precedent action
Criteria Deadline year
Effectiveness of High Priority Management Actions Determined 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
EYPHAR-5 MGT-PRP-MGTPL In 2017, prepare a 5 year Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan that includes the results from butterfly surveys and habitat assessments, genetic and marking studies, and climate and fire modeling to characterize habitat quality at occupied occurrences and unoccupied suitable habitat important for enhancing connectivity, expanding populations or that could serve as fire and climate refugia. The plan should include an overall management strategy, identification and prioritization of sites where management is needed, and specific management recommendations for each site. It should also include actions to reduce fire risk at prioritized occurrences and specifications for monitoring the effectiveness of implementing high priority management actions.
EYPHAR-6 MGT-IMP-MGTPL Beginning in 2018, implement highest priority management actions identified in the Harbison's Dun Skipper Management Plan.
Regional NFO 2018 VF

MON-PRP-MONPL PHABLA-2

Management units: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

In 2018, develop a long-term Blainville's Horned Lizard Monitoring Plan to track their distribution and status, habitat associations and level of threats in chaparral, coastal sage scrub and grassland vegetation communities across Conserved Lands in the MSPA. The plan should integrate with the Chaparral, Coastal Sage Scrub and Grassland Vegetation Monitoring Plan to include sampling at long-term vegetation monitoring plots. The monitoring plan should build upon previous surveys, habitat assessments and modeling to develop specific questions, monitoring methods, a statistically valid sampling design, sampling locations, and standardized protocols for determining the status and abundance of the lizard and for assessing habitat and threats at each sampling site to determine vegetation management needs. The plan should include guidelines for data analysis and preparation of a report with monitoring results and vegetation management recommendations.
Action Statement Action status Projects
PRP-1 Submit project metadata and Blainville's Horned Lizard Monitoring Plan to the MSP Web Portal. On hold
Criteria Deadline year
Blainville's Horned Lizard Monitoring Plan completed in 2018 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
PHABLA-3 MON-IMP-MONPL In 2019, begin implementing long term Blainville's horned lizard monitoring as specified in the Blainville's Horned Lizard Monitoring Plan. Prepare a report detailing lizard and habitat and threat assessment results and with site specific vegetation management recommendations.
Regional NFO 2019 VF

MON-IMP-MONPL PHABLA-3

Management units: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

In 2019, begin implementing long term Blainville's horned lizard monitoring as specified in the Blainville's Horned Lizard Monitoring Plan. Prepare a report detailing lizard and habitat and threat assessment results and with site specific vegetation management recommendations.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Submit project metadata, datasets, analyses and monitoring report with management recommendations to the MSP Web Portal. waiting for precedent action
Criteria Deadline year
Blainville's Horned Lizard Monitoring and Report completed by 2020 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
PHABLA-2 MON-PRP-MONPL In 2018, develop a long-term Blainville's Horned Lizard Monitoring Plan to track their distribution and status, habitat associations and level of threats in chaparral, coastal sage scrub and grassland vegetation communities across Conserved Lands in the MSPA. The plan should integrate with the Chaparral, Coastal Sage Scrub and Grassland Vegetation Monitoring Plan to include sampling at long-term vegetation monitoring plots. The monitoring plan should build upon previous surveys, habitat assessments and modeling to develop specific questions, monitoring methods, a statistically valid sampling design, sampling locations, and standardized protocols for determining the status and abundance of the lizard and for assessing habitat and threats at each sampling site to determine vegetation management needs. The plan should include guidelines for data analysis and preparation of a report with monitoring results and vegetation management recommendations.
Regional NFO 2021 VF

MON-IMP-MONPL QUEENG-1

Management units: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

In 2021, conduct Engelmann oak woodland monitoring as part of implementation of the Oak Woodland Vegetation Monitoring Plan on Conserved Lands in the MSPA.
Action Statement Action status Projects
IMP-1 Submit project metadata, monitoring datasets and reports to the MSP web portal waiting for precedent action
Criteria Deadline year
Oak Woodland Vegetation Monitoring Plan implemented 2021 2021
Code Obj. code Statement
OAKWOO-1 MON-DEV-MAP Starting in 2017, map tree mortality in oak woodlands across the MSPA using high resolution aerial imagery, LIDAR and other remote sensing data and incorporate existing datasets, where available, to determine the current status of oak woodlands in the MSPA that are affected by drought, wildfire and invasive pests and fungal pathogens.
OAKWOO-2 MON-PRP-MONPL Beginning in 2019, prepare an oak woodland vegetation monitoring plan for Conserved Lands in the MSPA to assess tree mortality and recruitment, including that of coast live oak and Engelmann oak, track community composition, structure and ecological integrity, and to document threats and assess environmental conditions. Prepare the oak woodland monitoring to integrate where feasible or bulid upon the results of other monitoring projects such as riparian forest and scrub vegetation monitoring, shothole borer/Fusarium complex monitoring, and golden-spotted oak borer and fungal pathogen monitoring. The monitoring plan should include a conceptual model, specific monitoring questions, the sampling frame within the MSPA, monitoring methods, a statistically valid sampling design, permanent sampling locations, timeline, and standardized protocols. Use the Oak Woodland Tree Mortality map and the distribution of coast live oak and Engelmann oaks to develop a sampling frame and stratified sampling design with permanent sampling plots spanning north to south and east to west environmental gradients across the MSPA. Evaluate ecological integrity at monitoring sites by integrating other types of monitoring into the long-term sampling plots, such as abiotic element monitoring (e.g., automated weather stations and soil sensors, GIS-data layers), ecological integrity monitoring (e.g., plant and animal communities, ecological processes), MSP VF species monitoring, and threats monitoring (e.g., fire, climate change, disease, invasive animals and invasive plants).
OAKWOO-3 MON-IMP-MONPL In 2021, conduct oak woodland monitoring to implement the Oak Woodland Vegetation Monitoring Plan on Conserved Lands in the MSPA.