San Diego Management & Monitoring Program


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2016 MSP Roadmap Dec 31, 2016: Torrey Pines Forest other


2005 DRAFT Torrey Pines State Reserve Trails Management Plan report


2006 Grouping and Prioritizing Natural Communities for the San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program report

Lead author: Janet Franklin
Prioritization of communities for monitoring was based on the following criteria: representativeness, extent, fragmentation, endangerment and threats. Aggregated communities that received high priority rankings based on several criteria include CSS and meadows & freshwater wetlands. Communities with high endangerment or threats should also receive high priority and include: Southern foredunes, Southern coastal salt marsh, Southern coastal bluff scrub, Maritime succulent scrub, Diegan coastal sage scrub, Southern maritime chaparral, Valley needlegrass grassland, Cismontane alkali marsh, Southern arroyo willow riparian forest, Southern willow scrub, Engelmann oak woodland, Torrey Pine forest, and Tecate Cypress forest. This report will: describe the current state of the MSCP Preserve, discuss natural community assemblages and alternative vegetation community classifications for the MSCP, describe the use of landscape stratification based on environmental variables as an alternative to vegetation classification, discuss the grouping of communities for the monitoring program, and prioritize natural communities for monitoring protocol development.

2003 City of San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program: Summary of Monitoring Results for Dudleya blochmaniae ssp. brevifolia report

Introduction: Short-leaved dudleya (Dudleya blochmaniae ssp. brevifolia) is listed by the State of California as an endangered plant species. The only five known occurrences of this extremely rare plant in the City of San Diego are Carmel Mountain, Del Mar Heights (Crest Canyon), Skeleton Canyon (UCSD), Torrey Pines State Park, and Torrey Pines State Park Extension. This plant is a perennial herb that typically blooms between April and June. The surveys conducted are listed in Table 1 below. The methodology and results of the monitoring are detailed below. The goal of the effort was to continue long-term monitoring of short-leaved dudleya under the Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP).

2004 City of San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program: Summary of Monitoring Results for Dudleya blochmaniae ssp. brevifolia report

Introduction: Short-leaved dudleya (Dudleya blochmaniae ssp. brevifolia) is listed by the State of California as an endangered plant species. The five known occurrences of this extremely rare plant in the City of San Diego are Carmel Mountain, Del Mar Heights (Crest Canyon), Skeleton Canyon (UCSD), Torrey Pines State Park, and Torrey Pines State Park Extension. This plant is a perennial herb that typically blooms between April and June. The surveys conducted are listed in Table 1 below. The methodology and results of the monitoring are detailed below. The goal of the effort was to continue long-term monitoring of short-leaved dudleya under the Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP).

2002 City of San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program: Summary of Monitoring Results for Dudleya blochmaniae ssp. brevifolia report

Introduction: Short-leaved dudleya (Dudleya blochmaniae ssp. brevifolia) is listed by the State Government as an endangered plant species. The only five known occurrences of this extremely rare plant are Carmel Mountain, Del Mar Heights (Crest Canyon), Skeleton Canyon (UCSD), Torrey Pines State Park, and Torrey Pines State Park Extension. This plant is a perennial herb that typically blooms between April and June. The surveys conducted are listed in Table 1 below. The methodology and results of the monitoring are detailed below. The goal of the effort was to continue long-term monitoring of short-leaved dudleya under the Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP).

2000 City of San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program: Summary of Monitoring Results for Dudleya blochmaniae ssp. brevifolia report

Introduction: Short-leaved dudleya (Dudleya blochmaniae ssp. brevifolia) is listed by the State Government as an endangered plant species. The only five known occurrences of this extremely rare plant are Carmel Mountain, Del Mar Heights (Crest Canyon), Skeleton Canyon (UCSD), Torrey Pines State Park, and Torrey Pines State Park Extension. This plant is a perennial herb that typically blooms between April and June. Monitoring for this plant was conducted on May 9, 2000 by Keith Greer and Holly Boessow and May 27, 2000 by Holly Boessow, Keith Greer, Heather Bruce, and Bernard Turgeon. The methodology and results of the monitoring are detailed below. The goal of the effort was to continue long-term monitoring of short-leaved dudleya under the Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP).

2001 City of San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program: Summary of Monitoring Results for Dudleya blochmaniae ssp. brevifolia report

Introduction: Short-leaved dudleya (Dudleya blochmaniae ssp. brevifolia) is listed by the State Government as an endangered plant species. The only five known occurrences of this extremely rare plant are Carmel Mountain, Del Mar Heights (Crest Canyon), Skeleton Canyon (UCSD), Torrey Pines State Park, and Torrey Pines State Park Extension. This plant is a perennial herb that typically blooms between April and June. The surveys conducted are listed in Table 1 below. The methodology and results of the monitoring are detailed below. The goal of the effort was to continue long-term monitoring of short-leaved dudleya under the Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP).

2014 Wildlife Response to Human Recreation on NCCP Reserves in San Diego County report

Lead author: Sarah Reed
Adaptive land protection and management strategies are fundamental to accomplishing the stated species and habitat conservation goals of federal Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) and California Natural Community Conservation Plan (NCCP) efforts. In San Diego County, the current NCCP reserve system includes more than 200,000 acres of protected lands, which are monitored and managed by multiple jurisdictions. The Wildlife Agencies (FWS and DFW, collectively), environmental groups, and reserve managers would like an improved understanding of how various threats and stressors may be affecting reserve performance for the benefit of 103 plant and animal species. The intent of this applied research project was to complement the existing species and habitat monitoring efforts in San Diego County by developing a program to assess the possible effects of human recreation on wildlife populations. Specific objectives were to: (1) Develop recommendations for a research for studying the effects of recreation on wildlife species; and (2) Test methods for monitoring recreation and complete a pilot field study.