San Diego Management & Monitoring Program


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2009 Brodiaea filifolia (thread-leaved brodiaea) 5-Year Review: Summary and Evaluation report

The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is required by section 4(c)(2) of the Endangered Species Act (Act) to conduct a review of each listed species at least once every 5 years. The purpose of a 5-year review is to evaluate whether or not the species? status has changed since it was listed (or since the most recent 5-year review). Based on the 5-year review, we recommend whether the species should be removed from the list of endangered and threatened species, be changed in status from endangered to threatened, or be changed in status from threatened to endangered. Our original listing of a species as endangered or threatened is based on the existence of threats attributable to one or more of the five threat factors described in section 4(a)(1) of the Act, and we must consider these same five factors in any subsequent consideration of reclassification or delisting of a species. In the 5-year review, we consider the best available scientific and commercial data on the species, and focus on new information available since the species was listed or last reviewed. If we recommend a change in listing status based on the results of the 5-year review, we must propose to do so through a separate rule-making process defined in the Act that includes public review and comment.

2010 Carlsbad Oaks North Habitat Conservation Area Annual Work Plan report

Lead author: Patrick McConnell
INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY This work plan has been developed from the guidelines for goals and objectives set forth in the City of Carlsbad Preserve Management Plan (PMP) for the Carlsbad Oaks North Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) dated January 2005 (Tierra Data 2005) and as agreed to by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG). This annual work plan also includes additional management activities that the Center for Natural Lands Management (CNLM, referred to in-text as the Center) feels are appropriate to protect and maintain the natural resources at the HCA in perpetuity. The HCA covers 326 acres, of which 108.4 acres are located within a conservation easement (CE) on lands owned by the County of San Diego. The CE was transferred to the Center in November of 2005. The Center received funds to manage the CE portion in May of 2006 at which time management activities commenced. The Center received fee title for the remaining 219.6 acres from the previous owner, Techbilt Construction Corporation (Techbilt), in March of 2007. The purpose of this work plan is to identify the tasks and budget required to complete the management activities for the upcoming management year that will begin on October 1, 2010 and end on September 30, 2011. This is the fifth annual work plan submitted for this HCA since receiving the original CE portion in May 2006. Unless otherwise stated, all tasks will be performed by the Center's Area Manager, Markus Spiegelberg, Center HCA Managers Patrick McConnell and Jessica Vinje. Summary of Tasks and Goals for the Management year: - Install and maintain existing signs and fences - Map all sensitive wildlife species observed, note all animal species observed - Continue census and habitat assessment efforts for the San Diego thornmint (Acanthomintha ilicifolia) and thread-leaved brodiaea (Brodiaea filifolia) - Conduct coastal sage scrub (css) long-term monitoring - Conduct coast live oak forest (clof) long-term monitoring - Track dead zone extent in southern parcel in CE portion of HCA - Begin restoring impacted thread-leaved brodiaea habitat - Monitor and control nonnative, exotic plants in restoration and enhancement areas in coordination with the developer of the Carlsbad Oaks North business park - Control non-native hollow-stem asphodel (Asphodelus fistulosus), artichoke thistle (Cynara cardunculus), Mexican fan palm (Washington

2018 Enhancing the Resilience of Edaphic Endemic Plants report

This study presents an approach for identifying and describing geographic areas that support edaphic endemic species and their habitat in a design that enhances resilience and provides opportunities for shifting distributions. We developed conceptual models to inform field studies and management, refined soils and vegetation attributes, and assessed regional population structure and threats. We used results to suggest prioritized locations for surveys, management, potential translocation, and additional conservation or acquisition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and San Diego Management and Monitoring Program (SDMMP) modeled suitable habitat for the target species under current and future climate scenarios; model results are in a separate report and referenced in this document, as appropriate. Target species include San Diego thornmint (Acanthomintha ilicifolia), thread-leaved brodiaea (Brodiaea filifolia), Otay tarplant (Deinandra conjugens), Dehesa nolina (Nolina interrata), and Parry’s tetracoccus (Tetracoccus dioicus).

2010 Calavera Hills and Robertson Ranch Habitat Conservation Area report

This work plan has been developed from the guidelines for goals and objectives set forth in the Calavera Hills Phase II Final Habitat Management Plan (HMP)(Planning Systems 2002), the Robertson Ranch East Village Open Space Land Management Plan (Planning Systems 2006) and the Robertson Ranch West Village Open Space Preserve Land Management Plan (Planning Systems 2007). These Habitat Management Plans have been reviewed by and agreed upon by the City of Carlsbad, United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG). The Center for Natural Lands Management (Center) holds conservation easements (since June 2006 for Calavera Hills Phase II, and February 2007 for Robertson Ranch East Village, and December 2007 for Robertson Ranch West Village Parcel 23C Phase I) on the Calavera Hills and Robertson Ranch Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) and performs or oversees the tasks identified in the three Habitat Management Plans (collectively HMP's). The HCA is comprised of seven parcels, commonly referred to as Village H, R, U, W, and X, Robertson Ranch East Village, and Robertson Ranch West Village PA 23C Phase I, the first phase of a two phase parcel recordation process. The Center has merged the funding and reporting for these two areas as we provided the developer a financial discount for selecting the Center to manage both properties. In other words, the funding for the Robertson Ranch areas is less than what we would normally charge had we not already received funding for the Calavera Hills Phase II areas. This will also simplify future budgetary, reporting, and planning considerations. The purpose of this work plan is to identify the tasks and budget required to complete the management activities for the upcoming management year that will begin on October 1, 2010 and end on September 30, 2011. Unless otherwise stated, all tasks will be performed by Center's Preserve Managers Patrick McConnell and Jessica Vinje and Rangers Justin Trujillo, Zadok Othniel and Roberto Bejar. Summary of Tasks and Goals for the Management Year: - Maintain signs and existing fences - Install signage, smooth-wire fencing, and vegetation to limit pedestrian and vehicular access - Census and conduct habitat assessments of thread-leaved brodiaea (Brodiaea filifolia), and San Diego thornmint (Acanthomintha ilicifolia) - Continue to set up and monitor coastal sage scrub (css) long-term monitoring plots - C

2005 Final Long-term Management Plan for Fox- Miller Property Open Space Carlsbad, California report

Lead author: Wendy Loeffler
This long-term management plan (LTMP) provides a framework for the enhancement and management of thread-leaved brodiaea (Brodiaea filifolia) populations, Diegan coastal sage scrub, native grassland, and southern willow scrub on the Fox-Miller Property open space, which includes approximately 18.11 acres of land in the city of Carlsbad, San Diego County. The dedication of the open space and the implementation of the associated LTMP fulfill a portion of the mitigation for impacts to the biological resources associated with development of the property. This plan will become effective following the completion and approval of the five-year maintenance and monitoring activities associated with the approved restoration plan prepared for this project. The open space will be managed in perpetuity to maintain and improve the habitat quality onsite. Habitat enhancement of the open space will benefit the thread-leaved brodiaea as well as a variety of wildlife species using the open space. Management guidelines and the responsible parties are identified in this document. This plan was written and is believed to be in conformance with the Multiple Habitat Conservation Program (San Diego Association of Governments [SANDAG] 1998), the City of Carlsbad's Habitat Management Plan for Natural Communities (City of Carlsbad 1999), and Section D of the draft Open Space Management Plan.