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2010 Resource Management Plan for Mount Olympus Preserve report

Mount Olympus Preserve (Preserve) is an approximately 707.6-acre open space preserve comprised of two non-contiguous parcels. The Preserve is located approximately six miles south of the City of Temecula just east of the Community of Rainbow in the northwestern portion of unincorporated San Diego County (County). The County Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) began acquiring the properties that make up the Preserve beginning in the early 1990s with the most recent property added in 2008. The Preserve contains valuable native habitats, as well as areas that have been marginally impacted by human activities. Currently, the Preserve is not open to the public; however, some evidence of unauthorized use is present. The Preserve is included in the County of San Diego’s North County Multiple Species Conservation Program (North County MSCP) preserve system.

2010 Baseline Biodiversity Report for the Mount Olympus Preserve in Unincorporated San Diego County, California report

Lead author: S Crawford
Michael Brandman Associates (MBA) conducted a baseline biodiversity study of the County of San Diego?s Mount Olympus Preserve (Preserve) to provide the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) with current baseline biological data and information to assist in developing a Resource Management Plan (RMP) including Area Specific Management Directives (ASMDs). The Preserve is located approximately six miles south of the City of Temecula just east of the Community of Rainbow in the northern portion of San Diego County, California. The Preserve is owned and managed by the County of San Diego DPR. Baseline biological surveys were conducted on the 707.6-acre Preserve in the late spring and summer of 2009 (April through September). They detected six vegetation communities including coast live oak woodland, native grassland, non-native grassland, non-native vegetation, southern mixed chaparral, and disturbed habitat were identified within the Preserve. Southern mixed chaparral is the most abundant vegetation community on the Preserve. Plant surveys documented 133 plant species occurring within the Preserve including three sensitive species, two of which are North County Multiple Species Conservation Program (North County MSCP) covered species. Wildlife surveys, along with incidental observations, documented 149 wildlife species within the Preserve including 16 butterfly species, 51 other invertebrate species , one amphibian species, 11 reptile species, 42 bird species, and 27 mammal species. A total of 13 sensitive wildlife species were detected, four of which are North County MSCP covered species.