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2008 Appendix A: Biological Diversity Baseline Report for the Hellhole Canyon Preserve County of San Diego report

Baseline surveys were conducted in the winter, spring, and summer of 2008. Biologists conducted the following surveys to assess the current status of biological resources onsite: (1) mapping of vegetation communities, (2) a floral inventory including rare plant surveys, (3) checklist butterfly surveys, (4) pitfall trapping to sample amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals, (5) focused arroyo toad surveys, (6) aquatic herpetofauna surveys, (7) diurnal avian point count surveys, (8) nocturnal avian surveys, (9) acoustic sampling and roost and foraging surveys for bats, (10) small mammal trapping using live Sherman traps, and (11) track and camera station surveys for medium and large mammals. Due to a series of drought years and recent wildfires that have burned much of the Preserve, results of these surveys may under-represent the diversity of plant and wildlife species that occupy the Preserve. Nine vegetation communities were mapped within the Preserve and consist of southern coast live oak riparian forest, Diegan coastal sage scrub, southern mixed chaparral, mafic southern mixed chaparral, non-native grassland, coast live oak woodland, eucalyptus woodland, disturbed habitat, and urban/developed. The most abundant vegetation community on the Preserve is southern mixed chaparral. Floristic surveys documented 337 plant taxa occurring in the nine vegetation communities. These include both native and non-native species along with seven sensitive plant species: Brewer?s calandrinia, Humboldt?s lily, Cleveland?s bush monkey flower, felt-leaved monardella, Fish?s milkwort, Robinson?s pepper-grass, and Engelmann oak. A total of 150 animal species were documented from the Preserve during the 2008 baseline surveys. These include 16 species of butterflies, three species of amphibians, 16 species of reptiles, 78 species of birds, and 37 species of mammals. No federally or state listed species were detected; however, 13 non-listed sensitive species were detected during baseline surveys.

2010 Final Baseline Biodiversity Survey for the Simon Preserve report

The Simon Preserve (Preserve) consists of approximately 617 acres in unincorporated San Diego County. Dudek biologists performed the following baseline biological surveys from spring through fall 2009: vegetation mapping, focused botanical surveys, exotic species mapping, general butterfly surveys, herpetological pitfall trap surveys, avian point count surveys, bat surveys, small mammal trapping, and large and medium mammal surveys. This report documents the methods and results of these surveys, and provides various management recommendations to preserve and enhance the function of the Preserve as biological open space in the context of the regional conservation goals of the draft North County Multiple Species Conservation Plan (North County MSCP). The County of San Diego Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) proposes to manage the Preserve in accordance with a Resource Management Plan (RMP) including Area-Specific Management Directives (ASMDs) that will be prepared based upon the baseline biological survey information established in this report. Based on species composition and general physiognomy, a total of 15 native or naturalized plant communities, including disturbed forms and mixed vegetation types, were identified on site: Diegan coastal sage scrub, disturbed Diegan coastal sage scrub, chamise chaparral, coastal sage scrub-southern mixed chaparral, disturbed coastal sage scrub-southern mixed chaparral, southern mixed chaparral, non-native grassland, southern coast live oak riparian woodland, southern cottonwood-willow riparian forest, southern riparian woodland, southern willow scrub, arrowweed scrub, coast live oak woodland, open Engelmann oak woodland, and eucalyptus woodland. In addition, disturbed habitat, developed land, and orchard land covers were identified. A total of 203 vascular plant species were recorded on the Preserve during surveys. Four specialstatus plant species were observed, of which three are covered under the North County MSCP, and one, San Diego thorn-mint (Acanthomintha ilicifolia), is federally and state listed. A total of 93 wildlife species were observed or detected on the Preserve during surveys, including 8 reptiles, 52 birds, 16 mammals, and 17 invertebrates. Seventeen special-status wildlife species were observed or detected on the Preserve, including five species covered under the North County MSCP.

2004 Barnett Ranch Open Space Preserve Biological Resources Report report

This biological resources report was prepared for the County of San Diego (County) in order to provide information on baseline biological conditions prior to the Cedar Fire of 2003 and to assist in the formation of Area Specific Management Directives (ASMDs) for the Barnett Ranch Open Space Preserve (Preserve) on the approximately 728-acre Barnett Ranch located in the unincorporated Ramona Community Planning Area of central San Diego County east of State Route (SR) 67 and south of SR 78. The project site supports 16 vegetation communities: southern coast live oak riparian forest, southern willow scrub, freshwater seep, riparian scrub, open water, open Engelmann oak woodland, coast live oak woodland, wildflower field, Diegan coastal sage scrub (including disturbed), coastal sage-chaparral scrub, southern mixed chaparral, non-native grassland, eucalyptus woodland, extensive agriculture, disturbed habitat, and developed land. No federally or state listed threatened or endangered plant species were observed on site; however, one plant species of federal special concern was observed: felt-leaved monardella (Monardella hypoleuca ssp. lanata). In addition, four plant species recognized as sensitive by the California Native Plant Society and/or the County were observed: delicate clarkia (Clarkia delicata), San Diego County viguiera (Viguiera laciniata), Engelmann oak (Quercus engelmannii), and ashy-spike moss (Selaginella cinerascens). No animal species listed as threatened or endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) or California Department of Fish and Game were observed on the site; however, 10 animals observed on site are federal species of concern: orange-throated whiptail (Cnemidophorus hyperythrus beldingi), coastal whiptail (Cnemidophorus tigris stejnegeri), coastal rosy boa (Lichanura trivirgata roseofusca), southern California rufous-crowned sparrow (Aimophila ruficeps canescens), loggerhead shrike (Lanius ludovicianus), California thrasher (Toxostoma redivivum), white-tailed kite (Elanus leucurus), Costa's hummingbird (Calypte costae), lark sparrow (Chondestes grammacus), and Pacific slope flycatcher (Empidonax difficilis). Ten animals observed on site are California species of special concern: silvery legless lizard (Anniella pulchra pulchra), prairie falcon (Falco mexicanus), northern red-diamond rattlesnake (Crotalus exsul), golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), Cooper's hawk (Accipiter cooperi), sharpshinned

2004 Barnett Ranch Open Space Preserve Biological Resources Report report

This biological resources report was prepared for the County of San Diego (County) in order to provide information on baseline biological conditions prior to the Cedar Fire of 2003 and to assist in the formation of Area Specific Management Directives (ASMDs) for the Barnett Ranch Open Space Preserve (Preserve) on the approximately 728-acre Barnett Ranch located in the unincorporated Ramona Community Planning Area of central San Diego County east of State Route (SR) 67 and south of SR 78. The project site supports 16 vegetation communities: southern coast live oak riparian forest, southern willow scrub, freshwater seep, riparian scrub, open water, open Engelmann oak woodland, coast live oak woodland, wildflower field, Diegan coastal sage scrub (including disturbed), coastal sage-chaparral scrub, southern mixed chaparral, non-native grassland, eucalyptus woodland, extensive agriculture, disturbed habitat, and developed land.

2006 Grouping and Prioritizing Natural Communities for the San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program report

Lead author: Janet Franklin
Prioritization of communities for monitoring was based on the following criteria: representativeness, extent, fragmentation, endangerment and threats. Aggregated communities that received high priority rankings based on several criteria include CSS and meadows & freshwater wetlands. Communities with high endangerment or threats should also receive high priority and include: Southern foredunes, Southern coastal salt marsh, Southern coastal bluff scrub, Maritime succulent scrub, Diegan coastal sage scrub, Southern maritime chaparral, Valley needlegrass grassland, Cismontane alkali marsh, Southern arroyo willow riparian forest, Southern willow scrub, Engelmann oak woodland, Torrey Pine forest, and Tecate Cypress forest. This report will: describe the current state of the MSCP Preserve, discuss natural community assemblages and alternative vegetation community classifications for the MSCP, describe the use of landscape stratification based on environmental variables as an alternative to vegetation classification, discuss the grouping of communities for the monitoring program, and prioritize natural communities for monitoring protocol development.