San Diego Management & Monitoring Program


Threats and Stressors
Urban Aseasonal Flow Study

in progress

Project description

Non-native plants and animals with associated changes to ecological processes cause threats to native plants and animals. The San Diego Management and Monitoring Program’s Management Strategic Plan (MSP) identifies these threats and stressors, and presents goals and objectives to monitoring their affects. The MSP has prioritized the study of the impacts of urban aseasonal flow on local and regional stream systems. The issue of seasonal wetlands in urbanizing landscapes has received varying amount of attention. The runoff can create a range of results from increased soil moisture levels, to geomorphic changes in creeks and perennial flows in xeric landscapes. USGS is working with SDMMP and their partners in the Management Strategic Plan Area (MSPA) to determine what GIS covariates of land cover/land use might correlate with field measurements of the phenology of water presence in small watersheds. This will help to identify where urban runoff is providing habitat for aquatic nonnative problem species in areas inhabited by arroyo toads, western pond turtles and vernal pool areas. Study sites were selected using a spatial model including layers for watershed size, land use, and conserved lands. Site selection also considered surface water monitoring sites for arroyo toad monitoring (Brown et al. 2016) and surface flow monitoring stations used by the California Water Quality Control Board, San Diego Region (SDRWQCB unpub. data). The combination of the three studies provide a network of surface water availability and temperature data from coastal San Diego to the foothills of the Cuyamaca, Laguna, Palomar, and Santa Margarita mountain ranges. A total of 56 sites were selected, assessed, and Stream Temperature, Indeterminacy, and Conductivity (STIC) loggers were deployed. This adds to the existing 64 loggers that were deployed to measure Arroyo toad habitat. For 120 loggers, the following steps took place. 1. The logger was placed in the field and the location was recorded with a high resolution GPS. 2. Photographs were taken of each logger location 3. Each site was revisited several times through 2015-2016 and native and non-native aquatic species were recorded. 4. The drainage area (or watershed size) for each logger was calculated in ArcGIS. 5. The land use upstream from the logger was assessed by calculating the percent urban, percent agriculture, percent open space, percent residential, and percent commercial/industrial. 6. Temperature and Conductivity were collected from loggers and graphed. Future work will include continued logging and graphing of temperature and conductivity, continued survey of the sites for native and non-native aquatic species, and statistical analysis


Project protocol

Name: No protocol available at this time


Project map URL

https://sdmmp.maps.arcgis.com/apps/View/index.html?appid=942dcd776c6e4ba9b362a09a32b1cada


Project spatial boundary

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Project focus

Project type: Monitoring

Target species: California Treefrog, goldfish, largemouth bass, Pacific Chorus Frog--TREEFROG


Implementing entities

Investigator: Robert Fisher

Main implementing entity: U.S. Geological Survey

Partner: San Diego Management and Monitoring Program

SDMMP lead: Yvonne Moore

Study lead: Chris Brown


Project funding agreements

Funding participants
Role Participants
funding source Environmental Mitigation Program

Strategic elements

Budget year: FY15-16 Work plan objectives number: 2.1